Category Archives: Poetry

Poetry Monday: Marianne Moore

We generally read or memorize one poem each week and spend a few moments learning about the poet’s life. I try to place each poet in time and location, along with any interesting information that makes them memorable. I’m hoping to make poetry a semi-regular posting here.

Marianne Moore
(1887 – 1972)

Marianne Moore was an American Modernist poet with sharp wit. She graduated from one of the “Seven Sisters”  – Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania. Ms. Moore made her living as a teacher in Pennsylvania and later as a library assistant in New York City. She wrote poetry throughout her life and beginning in 1915 her works began appearing in a number of literary magazines. She was awarded the Pulitzer prize, the National Book Award, and the Bollinger Award for her book Collected Poems (1951).

Her most well-known poem is titled Poetry. She was almost notorious for frequently revising her poetry. Poetry, for example, in its original incarnation was 32 lines. She revised it several times, eventually down to just three lines. I believe that the original poem is far more thought-provoking and ‘real’ than the final revision; her most evocative lines in the original have been omitted.  Take for instance this often quoted line:

Imaginary gardens with real toads in them.

The writer’s job, she seems to say, is to bring real life, sometimes ugly as toads, into the world of the imagination. Unlike the school-books and business documents she mentions earlier in the poem, poetry is a combination of the imagination and reality. Both are important but their role is quite different.

Here’s an audio recording of Moore I found reciting her poem Bird-Witted.

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Poetic Monday

We generally read or memorize one poem each week and spend a few moments learning about the poet’s life. I try to place each poet in time and location, along with any interesting information that makes them memorable. I’m hoping to make poetry a semi-regular posting here.

Author: Luo Binwang c. 640 – 684 Chinese poet of the Tang dynasty.

Luo Binwang was said to be able to recite poetry at the age of six and this poem, Ode to the Goose, is said to have been written when he was just seven years old. Luo Binwang is named as one of the four Heroes of Early Tang under Emperor Goazong. The Tang Dynasty was a golden age for Chinese poetry which was considered the highest form of literature.

Ode to the Goose

Goose, goose, goose
You bend your neck toward the sky and sing
Your white feathers float on the emerald water
Your red feet push the clear waves

Goose goose goose
Bend neck toward sky sing
White feather float green water
Red food push clear wave

The first version above is the literary English translation of our poem and the version we learned. The second version (below the first) is what might be a more literal English translation of the poem from the ancient Chinese. Translating Character based languages is tricky so depending on the translator may be interpreted differently so I take this information with a grain of salt.